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The political system of Grenada

Since independence from Britain in 1974, Grenada has formally been a parliamentary-democratic unitary state and a member of the Commonwealth. The British Queen is formally the head of state. She is represented by a Governor General. Legislative authority has been added to a parliament consisting of a senate with 13 nominated members (10 nominated by the prime minister and three by the opposition leader) and a House of Representatives with 15 members. The latter are chosen in general elections from single-person circles for up to five years. The voting age is 18 years. The executive has been added to a government, which is responsible to the House of Representatives. The Prime Minister must be a member of the House of Representatives. The country's politics have been marked by instability.

Political System of Grenada

The judiciary

The judiciary is administered by the Eastern Caribbean Supreme Court with its seat in St. Lucia, consisting of a Supreme Court and an Appeal Court. Two of the Supreme Court judges are located in Grenada. Local magistrates' courts will be sentenced in the first instance.

Grenada's defense

Grenada does not have military forces. The security is provided by a police force. See ABBREVIATIONFINDER for how GD can stand for Grenada.

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